Grow Salvia divinorum Salvia divinorum information Salvia divinorum legal status law Salvia divinorum images gallery Salvia divinorum cultivation growing community Salvia divinorum forum Donate to support Salvia Source
SalviaSource.org Forums - Salvia divinorum cultivation community
April 06, 2012, 06:08:50 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
Your Ad Here
 
   FORUM HOME   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2 3
  Print  
Author Topic: Rooting a Cutting in Water  (Read 12855 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Paradoxic
The Creator
Cultivator
*****
*
*

Expertise 113
Posts: 1074



« on: January 29, 2006, 10:54:00 pm »

Salvia divinorum is a very easy plant to propagate by cloning and rooting a cutting in water is one of the simplest and most effective methods for doing so. Take a cutting at least 4" (10 cm) long with at least 2 nodes. Cut approximately 0.5 inches (0.6 cm) below a node at a 45 degree angle. Use a knife or razor that has been sterilized (by burning it, soaking in alcohol, or both).

Find a bottle, glass, or vase thats about 2/3 the length of the cutting. Clean it out throughly (using 10% bleach solution or H2O2 is ideal) and fill it with purified water. Place the cutting in the water and cut off lower leaves if necessary. Its best to have at least one node above and one below the water. Top up the container when necessary, the cutting should have a few inches of stem under water.

Put the vase in indirect light (near a window is best) and keep the humidity above 50% (get as close as possible to 100%). You can cut off the bottom of a 2 liter soda bottle and place it over the cutting, but make sure to open it up everyday to remove C02 build-ups. You should mist the chamber with purified water. Ideal temperature is around 70F(20C).

To keep the cutting healthy you can foilar feed it, but this is optional. Spray it every few days with a low strength nutrient solution, use no more than a 50% strength solution. I use a solution of 2 tsp of Maxicrop Liquid Seaweed per gallon of water.

You should start to see roots form in 1-3 weeks. Once the roots are at least 1" (2.5 cm) long you can plant the rooted clone in soil or in a hydroponics system.


(Click to enlarge)
« Last Edit: December 15, 2007, 02:07:01 pm by Paradoxic » Logged
tator547
Guest
« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2007, 10:12:44 pm »

http://www.salviasource.org/images/gallery/90.jpg
LEAVES NEED LIGHT FOR CHEMICAL REACTIONS TO PRODUCE ROOTS but too much light ON THE ROOTS WILL KILL THEM THIS IS A GOOD SETUP couple things i thought that might need to be highlited
« Last Edit: December 18, 2007, 10:14:16 pm by tator547 » Logged
tigerbunni
Advanced Explorer
***

Expertise 4
Posts: 132



« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2008, 09:44:13 pm »

Nice, simple to understand guide,  appreciate it, Paradoxic!!!
Logged
gnorme
Explorer
**

Expertise 5
Gender: Male
Posts: 54



« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2008, 10:51:48 am »

Here u Got my latest little project..
Logged

Albert Hofmann R.I.P
donna81503
Junior Explorer
*

Expertise 2
Posts: 14



« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2008, 10:25:32 pm »

How about rooting in a brown vitamin bottle to prevent light from the roots?
D
Logged
JustAnotherRegularGuy
Cultivation Contributor
*
*

Expertise 103
Posts: 1361



« Reply #5 on: October 31, 2008, 11:54:55 pm »

That's a damn good idea donna81503! [Genius +] I have been racking my brain on how to keep my rooting area darker and that is a very simple solution. I am going to have to try that soon.

JARG
Logged
curiousmind
Newbie


Expertise 0
Posts: 9


« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2009, 01:10:11 am »

How about rooting in a brown vitamin bottle to prevent light from the roots?
D

Just curious if this was ever done and did it work?
Logged
drift
Tribal Elder
*****

Expertise 82
Gender: Male
Posts: 1121



« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2009, 12:10:51 am »

How about rooting in a brown vitamin bottle to prevent light from the roots?
D

Just curious if this was ever done and did it work?

Yes, I prefer it over normal water rooting. It's hard to tell in this pic, but this blosser cutting is rooting all along the stem at a much faster rate than my normal cuttings. Roots don't like light, so it only makes sense.

Logged
the twist
Junior Explorer
*

Expertise 0
Posts: 21


« Reply #8 on: June 21, 2009, 05:30:21 am »

i am trying to root in a brown beer bottle  is it better to have an airpump when rooting?
Logged
nitelife
Cultivation Contributor
*

Expertise 108
Gender: Male
Posts: 1197



« Reply #9 on: June 21, 2009, 12:25:25 pm »

i am trying to root in a brown beer bottle  is it better to have an airpump when rooting?

They say that it is because it delivers oxygen to the roots- but you have to use an air stone- which you can pick up at any local pet/aquarium store.
Logged
drift
Tribal Elder
*****

Expertise 82
Gender: Male
Posts: 1121



« Reply #10 on: June 22, 2009, 11:17:35 pm »

i am trying to root in a brown beer bottle  is it better to have an airpump when rooting?


I feel like a noob posting in support of water rooting. Here's what I recommend you do: take your cutting and stick it in some dirt. Give it humidity and in a week, it'll have roots.
Logged
Nezahualcoyotl
Tribal Elder
*****

Expertise 79
Gender: Female
Posts: 2829


...Because cultivation is the key to preservation!


« Reply #11 on: June 26, 2009, 11:37:27 am »

Really? You can root in straight dirt?
Logged

"We are the one's we have been waiting for" - Hopi Proverb
nitelife
Cultivation Contributor
*

Expertise 108
Gender: Male
Posts: 1197



« Reply #12 on: June 26, 2009, 12:29:04 pm »

Really? You can root in straight dirt?

LOL!
Of coarse you can!
It is probably the most effective method!
You just water a little more often and keep the soil a little more than damp but not soggy at all times for a week and you have a fully developed root system!
Logged
Nezahualcoyotl
Tribal Elder
*****

Expertise 79
Gender: Female
Posts: 2829


...Because cultivation is the key to preservation!


« Reply #13 on: June 26, 2009, 12:38:55 pm »

What about a cup or perlite with a cutting placed in it and then fill the cup with water?

This might be the best of both...
Logged

"We are the one's we have been waiting for" - Hopi Proverb
nitelife
Cultivation Contributor
*

Expertise 108
Gender: Male
Posts: 1197



« Reply #14 on: June 26, 2009, 12:43:04 pm »

It works... The perlite will usually float. I've tried it before, and algae is also a big problem.
Soil rooting has none of that Cool
Logged
drift
Tribal Elder
*****

Expertise 82
Gender: Male
Posts: 1121



« Reply #15 on: June 26, 2009, 07:01:00 pm »

Really? You can root in straight dirt?


How do you think nature has been doing it before we got involved?

*branch falls off*
*branch lands in soil*
*branch roots and forms new plant*
Logged
Nezahualcoyotl
Tribal Elder
*****

Expertise 79
Gender: Female
Posts: 2829


...Because cultivation is the key to preservation!


« Reply #16 on: June 26, 2009, 07:06:59 pm »

Very good point Drift.... but maybe the branch does better if it fall in a puddle?

I'd imagine that very wet soil would be best!
Logged

"We are the one's we have been waiting for" - Hopi Proverb
nitelife
Cultivation Contributor
*

Expertise 108
Gender: Male
Posts: 1197



« Reply #17 on: June 26, 2009, 08:44:56 pm »

Very good point Drift.... but maybe the branch does better if it fall in a puddle?

I'd imagine that very wet soil would be best!

Wet soil and humidity are key ingredients.
Logged
Nezahualcoyotl
Tribal Elder
*****

Expertise 79
Gender: Female
Posts: 2829


...Because cultivation is the key to preservation!


« Reply #18 on: June 27, 2009, 05:13:37 pm »

I think 1-3 days in water and THEN into moist soil may be best! I just tried it and it worked great!
Logged

"We are the one's we have been waiting for" - Hopi Proverb
drift
Tribal Elder
*****

Expertise 82
Gender: Male
Posts: 1121



« Reply #19 on: June 27, 2009, 05:41:12 pm »

I think 1-3 days in water and THEN into moist soil may be best! I just tried it and it worked great!

All of the methods work. I like to skip the water part entirely as that's the only part on which I have ever failed. My soil potted plants never rot.

But really I'm just lazy. Sticking it in some moist soil and giving humidity is so easy.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.15 | SMF © 2011, Simple Machines
bisdakworldgreen design by JV PACO-IN
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!