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Author Topic: Salvia divinorum Clones  (Read 15113 times)
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Nezahualcoyotl
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« on: July 23, 2009, 10:04:16 PM »

Paradoxic has kindly made me a knowledge contributor and asked me to compile some information about Salvia divinorum clones.

I know there are lots of various clones (also sometimes referred to as "strains") of Salvia divinorum, I'm trying to make a complete list of all of them and their origins and distinguishing characteristics.



Salvia divinorum Clones-

Salvia divinorum "Wasson and Hofmann" or "Bunnell" clone-
The original clone brought back to the United States and distributed around the world. The name "Wasson and Hofmann" was first applied to the clone in 1992 by the now-defunct ethnobotanical company "…Of the jungle". They began listing it in their catalog as the 'Wasson and Hofmann' clone to differentiate it from another clone they introduced the same year, "Blosser" or the "Palatable" clone. As it turns out, the "Wasson and Hofmann" clone is misnamed. This strain was not propagated from Wasson’s specimens—it was propagated from specimens that were obtained by another remarkable man, psychiatrist and ecologist Sterling Bunnell. It is quite clear from Wasson’s correspondence with Epling and others that he never brought live specimens of S. divinorum to the United States. The specimens that he obtained were all dried and pressed in Mexico. This clone is known to be both potent and reliable.


Salvia divinorum "Blosser" or "Palatable"clone-
A clone which was collected by anthropologist Bret Blosser in December 1991 and sold by the now defunct ...Of the Jungle ethnobotanical company.

Salvia divinorum "Cerro Quemado" clone-
A descendant of a Salvia divinorum plant collected by L.J. Valdes,III, (the first person to isolate Salvinorin A, the active chemical in Salvia divinorum) near the village of Cerro Quemado, Mexico in the 1990s.

Salvia divinorum "Luna" clone-
This is an unusual clone was discovered growing in a patch of the "Wasson/Hofmann" clone. It is either a sport of the "Wasson/Hofmann" clone that sprung up from the base of the surrounding plants, or it may have originated from a seed that fell from the neighboring plants. Given that it is extremely rare for Salvia divinorum to produce viable seeds and that any seedlings produced tend to be very weak, it is most likely that this is actually a sport, possibly some type of polyploid. The leaf morphology is distinctive. The margin is more deeply serrated and the leaf is more roundish than ovate. This is a morphologically distinct clone.

Salvia divinorum "Julieta" clone-
A strain collected by Daniel Siebert from a Mazatec shaman in Huautla de Jimenez (in the Sierra Mazateca, Mexico) in 1999.

Salvia divinorum "La Fuerza" (The Force) clone-
A strain collected by Kathleen Harrison, ethnobotanist and former wife of Terence McKenna, in January, 2001.

Salvia divinorum "Owens" clone-
A strain collected by Jack Owens on Cerro Rabon (in the Sierra Mazateca, Mexico) in June, 2003. Jack Owens was a major supplier of dried Salvia divinorum leaves to the US from Mexico. He died at the beginning of September, 2004 and this strain is named in his honor.

Salvia divinorum "Paradox" clone-
A cutting from a seed-grown clone raised by Daniel Siebert in 1994. Salvia divinorum derived from seed grown plants is difficult to find and should contain valuable genetics. Of all of the seed-raised clones known, this is the only one that is visibly unique. The leaves have a slightly mottled appearance. This is a morphologically distinct clone.

Salvia divinorum "Resilience" clone-
A cutting from a seed-grown strain raised by Daniel Siebert in 2002. Salvia divinorum derived from seed grown plants is almost impossible to find and should contain valuable genetics.

Salvia divinorum "Appaloosa" clone-
This is a variegated clone that was discovered by "Sage Student" in 1999. It originated as a sport on an otherwise normal specimen in his collection. The clonal identity of the plant that produced it is unknown because it was purchased from a source that did not identify it (most likely it was the Wasson/Hofmann clone). The cause of the variegation has not been positively identified. It is probably a chimera (an individual containing genetically different tissues) that resulted from a somatic mutation. It does not appear to be caused by a pathological condition. The leaves are marked with patchy white or pale-green areas and the stems have white striping. The amount of variegation is quite variable: some leaves are heavily variegated, while others appear completely normal. Growth of the pigment-free cells is stunted, causing leaf and stem deformations. "Sage Student" describes how this clone was nearly destroyed soon after it was discovered-
Quote
"The original plant was nearly destroyed, because when I first noticed it I thought it was diseased. Fearing it would infect my healthy Salvia plants, I hurled it into the woods to die far away from my healthy Salvias. But I then had second thoughts about what I had done, and realized it might not be sick after all but could be a rare mutant worth saving. I had to crawl on hands and knees through poison ivy to retrieve it!"
This is a morphologically distinct clone.

Salvia divinorum "Phoenix" clone- Ph♀enix (raised from seed in 2006 by Siebert; seed was from Carl's plants)

Huh?

Salvia divinorum "Moon Maiden" clone-

Raised from seed in 2006 by Siebert; seed was from Carl's plants

Salvia divinorum "Jupiter" clone-

Jupiter (raised from seed in 2007 by Siebert; seed was from Jupe's plants)

Salvia divinorum "Aquarian" clone-
This clone was raised from seed in 2006 by Siebert; seed was from Carl's plants.






Salvia divinorum clones collected in the Sierra Mazateca and vegetatively propagated-

Salvia divinorum "Wasson & Hofmann" or "Bunnell" (Collected by Bunnell in 19??)
Salvia divinorum "Palatable" (Collected by Bret Blosser)
Salvia divinorum "Cerro Quemado" (Collected by L.J. Valdés III in 198?)
Salvia divinorum "Julieta" (DS9902 - Collected by Daniel Siebert February 14, 1999)
Salvia divinorum "La Fuerza"  (Collected by Kathleen Harrison in January, 2001)
Salvia divinorum "Owens" (Collected by Jack Owens in June, 2003)
Salvia divinorum "Catalina" (KH96 - Collected by Kathleen Harrison July 1996)
Salvia divinorum "Bret Blosser #2" (Collected by Bret Blosser in Huh?)
Salvia divinorum "Delicious" (DS9901 - Collected by Daniel Siebert February 11, 1999)



Salvia divinorum (Other) Clones-

Echo (#DS9401 - Siebert 1994 seed raised)
Oracle (#DS9402 - Siebert 1994 seed raised)
Paradox (#DS9403)
Enigma (#DS9404 - Siebert 1994 seed raised)
Mystique (#DS9405 - Siebert 1994 seed raised)
Sacred Spring (#DS9408 - Siebert 1994 seed raised)
Hanau (#DS9903 - Siebert 1999 seed raised)
Maka (#DS9904 - Siebert 1999 seed raised)
Ph♀enix
Moon Maiden
Jupiter
Andromeda
Appaloosa
Luna- (#DS9401L)
Resilience
Green Witch Queen
Aquarian


Salvia divinorum "Lost Clones"-

Andromeda
Appaloosa
Valdés #1
Valdés #2


If you have any to add please let me know!



Rough draft... more tomorrow...


If anybody that has produced a Salvia clone (Jupe, Sea Mac, others) could please make an ID number for it, that would be great.

« Last Edit: February 05, 2010, 01:21:50 AM by Teotzlcoatl » Logged

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Nezahualcoyotl
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« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2009, 10:08:14 PM »

Some links with information about Salvia divinorum Clones-

Daniel Siebert's Info on Salvia divinorum clones-
http://www.sagewisdom.org/clones.html

Salvia divinorum Clone pictures-
http://sagewisdom.org/salviaphotos.html

Here we have an analysis of a few Salvia divinorum clones showing "Wasson and Hofmann" to be the most potent-
http://sagewisdom.org/phytochemical.html

Information on the Salvia divinorum "Andromeda" clone-
http://www.evenmo.com/seedling-cuttings.html
« Last Edit: July 23, 2009, 10:26:48 PM by Teotzlcoatl » Logged

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Nezahualcoyotl
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« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2009, 10:23:34 PM »

Quotes from Salvia divinorum Experts-

Daniel Siebert-
Quote
I am interested in determining whether or not some of the Mazatec's immediately contiguous neighbors, the Cuicatecs and Chinantecs, also utilize Salvia divinorum. I would also very much like to determine the identity of a plant called "Yerba de la Virgen," which according to a 1952 paper by Weitlaner was used by the Otomí people in the somewhat distant region of Tulancingo, Hidalgo in the same manner as Salvia divinorum. It would be fascinating if this turned out to in fact be Salvia divinorum; but even if it is not, it would be quite interesting to discover its identity.

I am also planning to look into the genetic diversity of Salvia divinorum. This plant very rarely produces seed, and even on the infrequent occasions when seed has been obtained, their viability has been quite low. Because of this, the plant is virtually always propagated asexually from cuttings. Truly wild, genetically diverse, seed-producing populations of Salvia divinorum have never been observed by botanists. At first glance, many populations of Salvia divinorum appear wild, but one must realize that the Mazatecs deliberately choose to plant it in out-of-the-way locations. They believe that it should not be grown where it will be seen by passers-by, lest it lose its power. In a humid environment, such as the wooded ravines in the Mazatec Sierras, stem sections quickly root when they make contact with moist soil. Once planted in such a location, the plant spreads asexually on its own within the immediate environment, propagating itself from branches that break off or fall over. After many years the plants becomes completely naturalized in that location, appearing quite wild. It is certainly possible that truly wild populations of Salvia divinorum exist somewhere. However, as I said, such populations have never been observed by botanists, and the Mazatecs I spoke with assured me that it does not grow wild, but is always introduced to a location through human effort. Therefore, it appears that this plant is a cultigen with very limited genetic diversity. It may be that there are relatively few genetically different clones of Salvia divinorum growing in the entire region, and it is entirely possible that this species is predominately monoclonal. I would like to collect more live specimens from a wide variety of locations throughout the region so that we can see if they appear to be genetically identical or not. This could be done using isozyme analysis or DNA fingerprinting techniques.
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Nezahualcoyotl
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« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2009, 11:36:30 AM »

I would also like this thread to deal with the theory that Salvia divinorum does not occur in the wild, outside of human cultivation.

Furthermore, I'd like to discuss the ancestral heritage of Salvia divinorum.

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Paradoxic
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« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2009, 02:57:22 PM »

Nice, this is a really good start. What we really need now is some pictures. Can anyone contribute them?

As for the cultigen hypothesis...I agree with it. My belief is actually that SD is a human-created hybrid species. I think it could have happened in a similar manor as peppermint. Peppermint was a cross between watermint and spearmint and it is mostly propagated by cloning since it rarely produces seed, like Salvia. The question is, what plants were crossed to make Salvia divinorum?
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Nezahualcoyotl
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« Reply #5 on: July 24, 2009, 03:11:13 PM »

Quote
Nice, this is a really good start.

Thank you!

Quote
Can anyone contribute them?

Do you think that is a good idea? What if they take a picture of the wrong clone and don't know it?

Quote
As for the cultigen hypothesis...I agree with it. My belief is actually that SD is a human-created hybrid species. I think it could have happened in a similar manor as peppermint. Peppermint was a cross between watermint and spearmint and it is mostly propagated by cloning since it rarely produces seed, like Salvia. The question is, what plants were crossed to make Salvia divinorum?

Well if it was a hybrid there would be two plants... I think it was just selectively breed for 1000s of years, and now the clones in cultivation are so far from the ancestor plant in the wild that they are no longer recognizable.

I also think it's possible Salvia divinorum was brought to Oaxaca, Mexico by humans from some other area.
« Last Edit: July 24, 2009, 03:14:35 PM by Teotzlcoatl » Logged

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Jupe
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« Reply #6 on: July 28, 2009, 10:59:23 AM »


....google up the history of the spanish invasions....as tracking down salvia BEFORE that period is elusive at best. the ancient maya "nauahtl" names have modern correspondences...(mushrooms, morning glories etc, but salvia is still argued about)

many folks think its only a few hundred years old.

many folks thought  coleus//// "the male" was one of the parents...(due to leaf structure, but its been "proven false due to chromosome count)

new strains are seeded by Carl, named by Siebert......

same for my one strain.

 I sent seeds to Siebert, he sprouts, then names them.  No one has more experience than he does.
« Last Edit: August 06, 2009, 10:07:34 AM by Jupe » Logged
Nezahualcoyotl
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« Reply #7 on: August 05, 2009, 11:36:34 AM »

I emailed Mr.Siebert about helping me with some of the facts.
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Mr. Sage
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« Reply #8 on: August 05, 2009, 07:09:10 PM »

Cool  Cool
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Nezahualcoyotl
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« Reply #9 on: August 06, 2009, 01:22:43 AM »

He responded and I added the info.
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drift
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« Reply #10 on: August 09, 2009, 12:24:32 AM »

Salvia divinorum clones:

Luna: heart shaped, serrated leaves
Every other strain: identical in almost every way.
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Nezahualcoyotl
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« Reply #11 on: August 16, 2009, 11:30:59 PM »

Paradox is a little different isn't it?

It has "mottled" leaves?
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nitelife
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« Reply #12 on: August 16, 2009, 11:37:11 PM »

Paradox is a little different isn't it?

It has "mottled" leaves?

hell yeah paradox is different!!

Do you see the yellow-ish markings on this leaf??

All of the mature paradox leaves get this "mottled" appearance, and paradox's stems grow thicker than other species in my experience- they are less hollow making them thicker so they don't need to be staked for a while.
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Nezahualcoyotl
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« Reply #13 on: August 16, 2009, 11:50:02 PM »

They look all wavy too.

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Nezahualcoyotl
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« Reply #14 on: September 07, 2009, 11:48:57 PM »

Salvia species which may be closely related to Salvia divinorum-

Salvia cyanea
Salvia concolor
Salvia Huh?

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Pyrate
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« Reply #15 on: September 08, 2009, 01:10:31 AM »

does being closely related mean possibly having some sort of similar effect?
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Nezahualcoyotl
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« Reply #16 on: September 08, 2009, 09:24:50 AM »

Possibly.

Finding Salvia divinorum's ancestors or a close cousin could tell us alot about the plant!
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« Reply #17 on: September 08, 2009, 03:33:40 PM »

do we have a closest known cousin of salvia divinorum?

its stuff like this that makes me want to change majors... or go for a minor
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Nezahualcoyotl
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« Reply #18 on: September 08, 2009, 07:52:22 PM »

Do it!

The only thing I know is what I posted, just that those two species are supposed to be closely related to Salvia divinorum.
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Paradoxic
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« Reply #19 on: July 12, 2010, 12:19:35 PM »

This is a sweet topic, I've wanted to get this going for a long time. If possible it would be great if you could try to collect pictures of the different clones. Perhaps start a topic to request them from other members.
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