Grow Salvia divinorum Salvia divinorum information Salvia divinorum legal status law Salvia divinorum images gallery Salvia divinorum cultivation growing community Salvia divinorum forum Donate to support Salvia Source
SalviaSource.org Forums - Salvia divinorum cultivation community
April 06, 2012, 03:12:50 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
Your Ad Here
 
   FORUM HOME   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Simple, Complete Salvia Grow Guide  (Read 7394 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
SkaPastora
Junior Explorer
*
*
*

Expertise 4
Posts: 13



« on: May 20, 2007, 09:31:10 pm »

This guide is a blend of online wisdom and knowledge from respected growers that share experience on the online communities all over the web.

General Info
As you all know, these plants like it warm and humid. They can be grown just about anywhere once they become used their environment. A few of the places I've grown them include greenhouses, cool basements, sunny windows, and an apartment with rather dry air. I think the biggest cause of failure is that people buy stressed, sick and injured cuttings and they just never get a chance to recover before they die. A good start makes the best finish. The best kind of plant to buy is one that already has roots and hopefully more than 2 or 3 sets of leaves. The best thing to do with a new plant is to stick it under a couple fluorescent lights and mist it often. Hopefully within a week or two you will start to see some vigorous new growth.

Watering
Iíve read a lot of different opinions on this topic. Basically, just keep the soil moist but not saturated. Itís ok to let the soil dry a little between waterings as long as the plants donít wilt too much. The only time over watering is really a problem is when the plants are young and donít have a good root system yet. Thatís when they just sit there in the mud and eventually turn brown and rotten. Too much water in the winter will also hurt them. Just watch the plants and theyíll let you know when theyíre thirsty.

Fertilizing
You can fertilize Salvia Divinorum with whatever you want. Thereís no magic fertilizer that they like best. Miracle Grow has always worked well for me. I give them a light dose about once a month. Basically, just water and fertilize them the same as any other houseplant and theyíll do fine.

Soil Mix
A good soil mix for Salvia is one with some organic material, peat moss, vermiculite, perlite and a little sand (Soil Mixes). Once again, thereís no magic formula. Most commercial mixes work well; just avoid the cheap black potting soil. The key is to make a mix with good drainage and lots of air. I've seen beautiful Salvia plants grown hydroponically as well, but I have no experience with it. I've always preferred soil.

Pests
Pests will probably be a problem at some point in time for you. Spider mites and whiteflies seem to love these plants. It only takes a few of them to start causing leaves to curl and turn yellow. My best advice is to keep a VERY close eye on your plants and take care of any bugs quickly to prevent an infestation. Once you have bugs either remove them with your fingers or use a spray bottle with water and a drop or two of Ivory soap in it to keep them away. Neem oil also works well as a preventative; just use it about twice a month and most bugsí stay away (Read about using Neem).

Cloning
Taking cuttings is pretty much the only way to make more plants. I donít recommend taking any cuttings until the plants are at least a foot tall and have several branches. If your plant has only one main stem wait until new branches start forming before topping it. Taking cuttings from an immature plant will usually result in rotten cuttings and a dead mother. I still havenít had one of my plants flower so I have no experience with growing from seed. The bad part is that Salvia cuttings can be hard to root and many cuttings wonít make it. Youíre best bet is to take a lot of cuttings and hope just a few make it. (Someís better than none!) Another tip is to only take cuttings from actively growing plants. Plants that aren't growing leaves probably aren't going to grow any roots either if you try rooting them.

  • Rooting in Water
    Salvia will root in water fairly well. Just take your cuttings and stick them in a glass or jar of clean water. Sit them on a windowsill or under lights and they should have roots in about 10 days. Make sure to change the water often so the stems donít get rotten. If the stem starts turning brown and the discoloration moves up the stem, the cutting is a lost cause. This rot is the most common cause of failure that Iíve seen when trying to root cuttings. I try to keep the cuttings in different cups so that if one gets rotten it doesnít spread to the other ones. Once a cutting has a bunch of roots, take it out of the water and plant it into some moist soil. Itíll need some TLC for a few days so keep an eye on it to make sure it isnít wilting. This is a time when misting is actually necessary. Another thing you can do if you live in a dry area is to cover the glass with a baggy to help keep the cutting from losing too much water. Hereís a picture of a cutting thatís rooting in a jar of water. This one will be ready to plant very soon. (it's a clickable image)




  • Rooting Directly in Soil
    This method also works well, sometimes... Take your cuttings and stick them directly into a moist soil. Mist the cuttings often and they will usually start to root within 2 weeks. The only problem Iíve had with this method is more stem rot. Maybe sterilizing the soil first would help, but Iíve never tried it.
    First, you get some clean trimmers and take the cuttings. Now you get yourself a flat and stick the cuttings into the soil. Next to the flat is the mother plant after being trimmed. An optional step is to use rooting hormones (IBA). I dipped one just for the picture but I didn't use any on the rest of the cuttings. I'm still not convinced that hormones make this particular species of plant root any better. Next, I put the flat under a fluorescent light and kept the humidity high (around 70%).
    Some things that could be experimented with to increase success are taking varied cuttings. I've noticed that smaller cuttings tend to do better than larger cuttings. Using rooting hormones may also increase success but I've never observed that they really made that much of a difference.
I guess the best advice is to keep trying until you find a method that works best for your plants. I usually use the glass of water technique because its easier, cheaper and usually works. Putting the cuttings into soil requires more work to keep the temps and humidity within range, and often results in more lost cuttings. Some plants such as Cannabis love to root right in the soil, but Salvia plants can be a little touchy.

WARNING - Health hazard when mixing perlite
The danger comes from the fact that perlite is composed of expanded volcanic glass, and when handled dry, releases a large amount of dust.  Repeated exposure to the dust over a long period of time can be hazardous to your lungs and in the short term can aggravate the symptoms of bronchitis and emphysema. The easiest way to completely avoid the hazard is to thoroughly wet the perlite in the bag before mixing it with your soil, thereby completely eliminating the dust issue. If you are working with perlite on a daily basis and canít wet it, use a particulate respirator having a minimum specification of 2200N95 as set forth by OSHA.
« Last Edit: August 16, 2008, 10:15:06 pm by Paradoxic » Logged
Paradoxic
The Creator
Cultivator
*****
*
*

Expertise 113
Posts: 1074



« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2007, 02:50:34 am »

Sweet guide! We need a simple, complete guide here. I re-formatted it a little. But if you are going to add that image you talk of in the rooting in water section you should add it. I moved this topic into the cultivation section. So now post info topics into the appropriate forum (in the forum category "Cultivation Section".

Thanks a lot. And I have made you a Cultivation contributor btw.
Logged
gewf
Guest
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2007, 06:07:21 pm »

great guide, im still in the early stages so this is perfect Smiley!
Logged
cheesie
Guest
« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2007, 07:11:09 pm »

i have found when taking a cutting after plcaing in a glass of water for a few days place it into damp soil for a day or so thne place back into the glass..speeds up rooting..something to do with darkness and stuff...anyway hope it helps.
Logged
Paradoxic
The Creator
Cultivator
*****
*
*

Expertise 113
Posts: 1074



« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2007, 03:21:27 am »

Hmmm thats really interesting. I wonder if it would work if you covered up the rooting glass to try and achieve the same effect. I will definitely try this out.
Logged
MstryShovel
Elder Explorer
****

Expertise 52
Posts: 638



« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2007, 03:10:30 pm »

i would think it would help
roots like dark leaves like light
when a root notices it is in light it thinks its above ground and the plant will either cut it off (stop growing the root) or try to go deeper darker, of course rooting in water works but i'd be interested to wonder how much this covering the rooting jar works
Logged

And it was the last normal thing before the world broke apart. . .
tator547
Guest
« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2007, 12:32:21 am »

Trying this one results will be posted in a couple days
Logged
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.15 | SMF © 2011, Simple Machines
bisdakworldgreen design by JV PACO-IN
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!