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Author Topic: Watering/Fertilizing  (Read 10380 times)
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Jupe
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« Reply #20 on: October 01, 2007, 10:04:46 pm »

 Just what you need.  Nitrosol seems like a good company, from a glance at their site.

At one end of the spectrum is pure chemicals, usually derived from petroleum or other industrial sources.. at the other end, is pure manures and cover crops, with zero "chemical" input. They often can take 2 seasons to release their chemicals, but soil is gradually built stronger with each application.

In the middle are all the various products with a little of both, the fish emulsions, blood and bone meals,  seaweed extracts...and then the various mixtures, depending on what your goal is.

8-6-3 is a good lower strength number..(as compared to 60-0-0 Nitrogen, which burns your fingers, but is great for breaking down  cellulose piles, like dry leaves)  you shouldn't have any troubles with Nitrosol.

20-10-10 is somewhere in the middle....but you can burn plants if you don't follow measuring instructions carefully.
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strangeworld
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« Reply #21 on: October 02, 2007, 03:12:46 am »

Ok good stuff. Thanks for the advice guys - there may be hope for me as a gardener yet Smiley
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Paradoxic
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« Reply #22 on: October 03, 2007, 01:37:48 am »

Damn 60 Nitrogen would be intense. I use a very low-strength fertilizer, Maxicrop seaweed. Its 1-0-1, but Salvia seems to love it. It works really well for foilar feeding.

It would be really sweet if they had something similar to GH 3-part except with organics. This would allow you manipulate the N-P-K ratio and see what Salvia responds to best. Does anyone know if anything like this exists?
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Cakes
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« Reply #23 on: November 03, 2007, 06:58:04 pm »

The best all organic company might be Grotek.net.

I have been using foods and yard material for fertilizers; like oats, rice, fruit, etc. I haven't used it on salvia but for rampant marijuana growth it works good. I've used it on seedlings and all the way through bud (i have a legal med garden in california). we put the foods in a blender with water and then use in a solution straight on the soil. It seems like 8 tablespoons of material per gallon of water is comparable to a full strength feeding of commercial ferts. We give plain water every 5 - 6 feedings.

Apple, fruit  .05 - .02 - .10
Apple, fruit pomace (what’s left after squeezing)  .20 - .02 - .15
Apple leaves  1.00 - .15 - .35

There are databases where you can see the N-P-K values in foods and plants.
(protein=nitrogen, all others called by "real" names).

here is the database for plants, it gives ppm of each chem:

http://sun.ars-grin.gov:8080/npgspub/xsql/duke/listchem.xsql

here is for food, to see the % of N-P-K, use the option that says "100 gram" servings. so that way if a food has 1 gram potassium, it has 1% potassium. If it has half that, 500 mg, then it = .5% K.
or 5 mg = .005%

www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/

and this page is good:
http://www.ars-grin.gov/duke/   
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Paradoxic
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« Reply #24 on: November 05, 2007, 11:08:28 pm »

Damn thats sweet. I didn't know that you could put food straight into the soil with good results, I thought you had to compost it first.

This might make a good article for organic fertilizing. Would you be interested in posting one, I'd be happy to make you a contributor.

Oh, and I was looking at that Grotek site, looks like some badass organic fertilizer.
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Cakes
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« Reply #25 on: November 06, 2007, 09:04:52 pm »

Fox Farm is also good. They have a veg formula (6-4-4) with all the micronutrients in it called "Big Grow".

That stuff is all good if you have the cash, but I'm telling you dude, cheap ferts have bailed me out. and they are totally customizable.

I'd be happy to post up a bigger text if you like; wherever you want.
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Paradoxic
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« Reply #26 on: November 07, 2007, 12:59:34 am »

Yeah, you should post a new, big article on organic fertz (w/ the real fruit and such). I made you a cultivation contributor so just post it in the General Indoor/Outdoor Growing section.

 Smiley
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RationalGaze
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« Reply #27 on: May 04, 2009, 04:11:24 pm »

I was wondering if anyone has tried those aqua globes on there plants? or if it is a good or bad idea to try.
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|if3
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« Reply #28 on: May 05, 2009, 03:45:46 am »

Some people have, it's not a bad idea, as long as the soil doesn't get water logged. If the soil contains a lot of peat moss, then Don't. But if it contains a lot of sand, or perlite/vermiculite: then feel free to add a few Tongue.
I'm using Blumat's for my plants, I only have two, one in each 30lbs container. Obviously not enough to keep continually watering them sufficiently, but it helps to prolong the need for watering Smiley.

Happy Growin',
James
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capt44
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« Reply #29 on: May 05, 2009, 04:20:47 am »

In my nursery when moving my rooted cuttings to pots or grow beds I usually don't fertilize much the first season, in the spring I usually use a slow release fertilize like osmocote 14-14-14 meaning that the nitrogen is released slowly over a 4 month period.
Most chemical fertilizers release nitrogen fast which can burn the newly developed roots on a cutting.
Organic is a good method fertilizing a few plants.
This is from my experience in rearing new plants.
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Peaches
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« Reply #30 on: May 05, 2009, 10:26:45 am »

In my nursery when moving my rooted cuttings to pots or grow beds I usually don't fertilize much the first season, in the spring I usually use a slow release fertilize like osmocote 14-14-14 meaning that the nitrogen is released slowly over a 4 month period.
Most chemical fertilizers release nitrogen fast which can burn the newly developed roots on a cutting.
Organic is a good method fertilizing a few plants.
This is from my experience in rearing new plants.

 Welcome to SS Capt44 ,
 
 Excellent post,

 I make compost tea for my plants and they love it.

 youtube has directions on making  this for anyone intrested in trying it.
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Nezahualcoyotl
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« Reply #31 on: May 05, 2009, 01:23:17 pm »

I say go all organic!
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RationalGaze
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« Reply #32 on: May 26, 2009, 10:44:55 pm »

I was wondering if any body knows of any good fertalizers I could find at a store near me that would be good for  my plants.  I was also wondering if you spray fertalize them do you have to put fertalizer in the water as well or not.


Thanks
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